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Frequently Asked Questions

Metro OB/GYN is a trusted resource for answers during every stage of a woman’s life. We’ve listed many of the frequently asked questions we hear from our patients and encourage you to reach out with further questions or concerns.

Frequently Asked Questions

The cervical cancer vaccine prevents cervical cancer, which is known to be caused by HPV (Human Papillomavirus).

Metro OB/GYN recommends the vaccine, which covers the 9 most common strains of HPV. The FDA recently expanded the approval to include women up to age 45. It is given as a series of three injections at one, two, and six month intervals. An initial consultation to discuss details and eligibility is necessary.

Call our office to schedule either a telehealth visit or in-person exam.

Women age 40 and older should have mammograms every year. However, if you had a first degree relative with breast cancer, like your mom or sister, you may need a mammogram 10 years before your relative was diagnosed. So, if your sister was 35 at diagnosis, you would start getting screened at 25. If you have a strong family history for breast cancer, or are a carrier for one of the genes which predispose you to cancer, you may need to start as early as age 25.

Oversights happen, but it’s important to take the proper steps. Generally speaking, if you miss one pill, take the missed dose as soon as you remember.

If you miss more than three pills during the month, please use back-up contraception for the rest of the month. You may experience some irregular bleeding.

While it’s best to try to schedule your annual exam for when you’re not having your period, we can still conduct a pap smear as long as the flow isn’t overly heavy.

Mothers who are or will be over 35 at the time of delivery are often considered to be at higher risk for developing babies with chromosomal abnormalities.

We offer early screening and blood testing for such patients to rule out the risk of chromosomal abnormalities, or can refer you to a high-risk pregnancy specialist for diagnostic testing like chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis.

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can be harmful to your growing baby. It is best not to drink at all during pregnancy, as we have no knowledge of how little is safe. Give your baby the best start in life–please don’t drink.

Smoking is unsafe and increases one's risk for many diseases. During pregnancy you should not smoke as it can cause underweight babies and premature deliveries. Smoking during pregnancy can cause underweight babies and premature deliveries. It also increases the risk of health problems for developing babies and increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

We recommend that you get a flu shot if you’re pregnant during flu season. It’s safe to get a flu shot even if you are in the first trimester.

Morning sickness is nausea and vomiting that occurs during pregnancy, traditionally in the first trimester. Though it’s name says otherwise, morning sickness can occur any time of the day or night. Most morning sickness lessens as the pregnancy advances into the second trimester.

However, if your morning sickness is intense and causing significant complaints, please get in touch with us to discuss more effective medication and how to best optimize your hydration and nutrition status.

Pregnancy can be exhausting! To combat fatigue, develop a well rounded diet, good nutritional habits, and eat frequent and smaller meals. Develop good sleep habits and increase your rest periods as pregnancy advances. Proper exercise improves your cardiovascular health and decreases your stress. You can reach out to our counselors for additional advice on mental and physical wellness recommendations.

Oxytocin is a natural hormone produced by a woman’s body that causes uterine contractions. Pitocin is the synthetic form of oxytocin, and is generally used to induce labor, or to augment labor by increasing the strength and duration of contractions for improvement of labor. Pitocin is only administered in the hospital, under a tightly controlled delivery system where only small amounts are used.

Oxytocin is a natural hormone produced by a woman’s body that causes uterine contractions. Pitocin is the synthetic form of oxytocin, and is generally used to induce labor, or to augment labor by increasing the strength and duration of contractions for improvement of labor. Pitocin is only administered in the hospital, under a tightly controlled delivery system where only small amounts are used.

An amniocentesis is a definitive test where a high-risk doctor withdraws a small amount of amniotic fluid that surrounds the baby under ultrasound guidance to determine if the baby is affected by certain chromosomal abnormalities.

With an amniocentesis, there are risks of membranes rupturing and infection, leading to loss of the baby in up to 1% of cases.

The CVS test (chorionic villi sampling) can be performed earlier, around 11 to 13 weeks of pregnancy, and gives much of the same chromosomal information as an amniocentesis.

This test is also done under ultrasound guidance by a high-risk specialist.

During the test, a small sample of cells is taken from the placenta where it attaches to the wall of the uterus.

This sample is then used to detect birth defects, genetic diseases, and other problems during pregnancy. There is also a risk of pregnancy disruption with this test as well.

Having an epidural for pain management during labor is the preferred choice for many patients. To administer an epidural, a needle is placed between the vertebrae of the mother into a space called an epidural space. Medication is then placed into this space. A small catheter is then threaded through the needle into the space and the needle withdrawn. The catheter is left in place and taped so that it does not move.

Women in labor can then be given a continuous small amount of medication or be given a bolus dose when you begin to have pain. An epidural relaxes the pelvic muscles and the nerves are bathed in the local anesthetic medication which causes an insensitivity to pain. An epidural will not cause harm to the baby. A woman in labor will still feel the pressure of the contractions and the urge to push. After the baby is born, the catheter is removed.

Complications may include:

  • A drop in blood pressure
  • Allergic reactions to the medication
  • A true spinal block
  • Occasionally, slowing labor for a short period of time

Epidural anesthesia does not increase your chances of having a c-section or forceps delivery.

This study was developed to diagnose chromosomal birth defects as early as possible. Between the 11th and 13th week of pregnancy, a vaginal ultrasound study is performed to measure nuchal thickness (skin thickness at the level of baby’s neck) along with a blood test, which can be done as early as 9-10 weeks. These measures are then calculated to assess your risk level for Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome) and Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13, as well as determine the gender of your baby, if you wish to know it.

Childbirth classes are useful tools where open discussions and learning occurs. They are a place to ask questions, gather information, and to socialize with other pregnant women and their families. Knowledge is powerful and helps every parent prepare for their impending labor. 

Childbirth classes provide education on:

  • Common questions in pregnancy and labor
  • Prenatal development
  • Premature labor and how to identify it
  • The hospital, nurses, rules and regulations
  • How to tell if this is labor.
  • What to expect during labor and birth
  • Pain relief options.
  • Caring for your new baby.
  • Breastfeeding and lactation support

We encourage our patients to register as early as possible. For HVSH, you need to register online at www.hvsh.org

Have a question we didn't cover?

If you have concerns or questions that you don’t see here, please contact us online or call us at our office at (248) 360-9090.

Resources

Please follow this link here to download our Authorization to Release Medical Records Form.

Please follow this link here to download our Patient Information Form to fill out before your visit.

Please follow this link here to download our questionnaire to fill out before your visit.

Please follow this link here to view and/or download the 3 Hour Glucose Diet.

Thank you,

Metro OBGYN Staff

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